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Ceramics - Studio & Modern


Name: JAPANESE MEIJI PERIOD CATFISH SHAPED INCENSE BURNER BY SUWA SOZAN I
SOLD
Inventory #: B2YU-03
Description: Japanese Meiji Period incense burner in the shape of a catfish by SUWA SOZAN I (1852-1922). The incense burner comes with TOMOBAKO, or original artist signed wooden storage box. Sozan I was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in, or Imperial Artist. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. His works are in the permanent collection of Kyoto National Museum among many others. (nodenesu)
Age: Meiji Period (1868-1912)
Size: See Description
Price: Sold